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July 2018

July 4th 2018

July
Let us give thanks and pray.

Today is a day to give thanks

       To those who have served and sacrificed

       To preserve our God given liberties

       To thank those who have handed on

       Their faith and their civic virtues

       To we their children

       And to pray that our nation always

       Walks with our God

       That God give us strength and courage

       To do so

       And to guide us on the way of mutual respect

       And peace.


St. Swithun

An English abbot renowned for miracle working and his sanctity of life. Since it rained on the day his relics were translated from outdoors to indoors, the legend grew that it would rain continuously for 40 days if it rained on his feast day. The same is said to be true for sunny weather. Apparently even meteorologists note that the weather pattern in England on this day tends to be rather stable and might be a predictor of weather to come.

He is the patron saint of Winchester Cathedral where a modern shrine stands over his original resting place which was desecrated during the reign of Henry VIII.

Shrine
Swithun

 


Discuss and Debate, Don't Demonize

Demonize

A New Kind of Bigotry


Over the short history of our nation, we have struggled with bigotry of various kinds and generally have forged agreement that bigotry has no place in a democratic country. Not only does it marginalize certain groups, often denying them their fundamental God-given rights but tears at the fabric of our common good.
The consensus that irrational hatred for certain groups is odious seems to be dissolving over the last decade or more. Now it seems acceptable for certain groups to demonize even those who have different opinions than their own. Rational discourse is gone. Civic protections become unraveled by press or mob outcry. Employers cave into pressure from the loudest special interest group who protest the employability of persons holding certain opinions. We don’t discuss, we litigate.
As we reflect on the history of our nation this weekend, perhaps we can nourish the hope for rational civic discourse and debate to return to the public square. If we can’t even talk with our fellow citizens and elected representatives, how can we hope to hold our own in the world.
The spirit of hope and healing which Jesus brings in today’s gospels and the reminder that we are all made in the image of likeness of a loving God from Wisdom can focus our prayer for national unity around respect for persons, not only of different races or lifestyles, but also Americans who in good conscience hold different opinions from our own.